Revealed, the five pages you shouldn’t include on your website

12/05/17Revealed, the five pages you shouldn’t include on your website

Since we launched in January, every week has been full of interesting and exciting conversations.

Last week was no exception. But intriguingly the same subject kept cropping up; website content. Specifically, the content that many advisers include on their website, but in my view has no place being there.

In my experience, there are a number of key pages, which rarely get any significant traffic, yet all too often appear on adviser’s websites.

We’ve all seen them, the list of:

  1. Pensions
  2. Investments
  3. Protection
  4. Mortgages
  5. Insurance

The list could go on, but I’ll stop there. Frankly, I’m dozing off already.

Unfortunately, these pages are often included at the expense of content visitors actually want and need.

What do visitors want?

Visitors to your website want to know you can solve their financial problems; that you have the experience and knowledge to deal with their issues. They assume that you know what a pension, an ISA or life insurance is. And, if they don’t, they won’t be heading to your website to find out. They will use Google, as we all do, and then select from the search results; probably Money Saving Expert, Money Supermarket, Money Advice Service (yeah, I know!) etc etc.

Advisers can’t compete with the resources these sites throw at their content strategy, and nor should they try to. That’s why the content you do publish has to hit the mark with your visitors.

Duplicate content

The futility of talking about products, is compounded by the error of doing so using duplicate content. Talking about products is bad enough, but using the same content as dozens of other advisers will do you no favours.

While I’m on this particular soapbox, I also see advisers including news feeds on their websites.

Again, I’ve got to ask: why?

No one is visiting your website to get their latest news fix. Furthermore, if they happen to spot something interesting and click the link, you’ve just sent them to another website. There’s no guarantee they will return to yours.

Finally, the headlines are usually negative, why on earth would you want that to be displayed on your site?

Guilty M’lud?

How do you plead: guilty, or not guilty?

If you’re admitting to these crimes against the internet, could I suggest the following rehabilitation

  • Review your site, and write content visitors will actually read:

About you: Explain the types of clients you work with and the problems you solve for them

About us: Give information about your business, your history, help the visitor understand who you are

Reasons to work with you: Don’t be shy, explain why the visitor should get in touch and select you over other advisers they are considering

Meet your team: Such an important page, it’s a cliché, but people buy people

Case studies: These show the practical application of what you’ve explained in the ‘About us’ page

Testimonials: Despite the cynics, I wouldn’t launch a website without including testimonials, from satisfied clients, happy with how you have helped them

FAQs: Addressing concerns visitors might have before they get in touch

  • Consider what to do with the existing, product related, pages. If it is duplicate content, take it down. If it isn’t, and was written specifically for your website, I’d be inclined to leave it on the site; I’m not sure I want to show Google I am removing content, but reduce it’s prominence
  • If you have a news feed on your website, take it off and replace it with something useful instead. A guide perhaps, or a great piece of content that you want them to read, and more importantly, they will get some value from

I’ll now descend from my soapbox and apologise if this blog has been a little on the ‘ranty’ side.

Until next week…

PS I hope you’ve found it useful, if you have, then please share it with others. The social share buttons are down here:

Share this post: